Jump to content

Welcome to HPFT

We are a multi-fandom/original fiction community with roots in the Harry Potter fandom community. We strive to maintain a strong focus on author feedback and inclusive writing. Here on the forums, you can join a house and participate in House Cup events, participate in writing challenges, play games, and much more!

Join the Forums

Check out the Archives

HPFT has a moderated multi-fandom/original fiction archive with an unlimited queue. There you can post your writing, as well as read and review other members' writing. Be sure to stop by and check out our latest featured stories!

Join the Archives

Find us on Social Media

HPFT is active on social media. You can find us and many members busily tweeting on Twitter, join us for livestreams on YouTube, check out aesthetics on Instagram, get sneak peeks on Snapchat, and interact on Tumblr! All our social media links can be found below.

News Ticker
  • Good luck to all the NaNoWriMo participants! Don't forget to stop by the Cafe.
  • What did the golden snitch say when Harry Potter was itchy?
  • Quidditching!
lllb

Book Recommendations

Recommended Posts

lllb

To be a writer you need to be a reader, and chances are you read published novels as well as fan fiction or original fiction posted online. Stop by and let us know when you've read a fantastic book, so that we can add it to our reading lists!

 

[b]Title:[/b]
[b]Author:[/b]
[b]Genre:[/b]
[b]Year published:[/b]
[b]Summary:[/b]
[b]Why I would recommend it:[/b]

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pookha

Title: Uprooted

Author: Naomi Novik

Genre: fantasy

Year published: 2015

Summary: The Dragon, a wizard, takes a girl from the village every 10 years. This year he chose Agnieszka, to the surprise of everyone. She learns magic and more importantly about herself.

Why I would recommend it: This was the best book I've read since 'The Name of the Wind.' At first I thought it was merely going to be a re-telling of Beauty and the Beast, and as that it would have been fine, but it's so much more. It's a brilliantly written 'coming of age' story for Agnieszka and the politics  ring true. It's a tale of how people can want what's right, but still be misled by evil influence.  So well-written.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TreacleTart

Title: The Night Circus

Author: Erin Morgenstern

Genre: Fantasy

Year published: 2012

Summary:The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des Rêves, and it is only open at night.

 

But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway: a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors. Unbeknownst to them both, this is a game in which only one can be left standing. Despite the high stakes, Celia and Marco soon tumble headfirst into love, setting off a domino effect of dangerous consequences, and leaving the lives of everyone, from the performers to the patrons, hanging in the balance.

Why I would recommend it: If you love beautiful imagery and descriptive prose, this book is for you. I first and foremost found that this was just lovely to read. The wording was perfect.

 

Aside from that, I feel like this was a really cool concept. It was magic and tricks in a circus setting, but without all of the carnival cliches. It was all in all just a really stunningly beautiful story about a group of people and how their interactions affect each other.

 

Hands down my favorite book in at least the last 5 years.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MalfoysAngel

Title: The House of Night Series (12 books total for the main series plus 4 novellas and 2 stand alone books written in the same universe)

Author: PC Cast & Kristin Cast

Genre: YA, Fantasy

Year published: 2007-2014

Summary: Zoey Redbird is marked as a Fledgling and must give up the life she has always known and move to the House of Night where she will either make the change into a Vampyre, or she dies. Along the way she make a powerful enemy intent on ridding the world of humans. Now not only does she have to deal with the change, she has to save the world too.

Why I would recommend it: I fell in love with the story line. The series takes place mostly in Tulsa, Oklahoma, but also on the Isle of Skye and combines Native American heritage with Wiccan/Pagan rituals. its also LGBTQA+ if that's something you look for in a series.

 

I don't want to give too much away, but Zoey basically has to deal with typical teenage issues, and some issues that no one should go through at 17, on top of trying to save the world and dealing with a change that could kill her.

 

Also the book list in order is Marked, Betrayed, Chosen, Untamed, Hunted, Tempted, Burned, Awakened, Destined, Hidden, Revealed, Redeemed. Must be read in order for the story to make any sense. (The Novellas are Dragon's Oath, Lenobia's Vow, Neferet's Curse, Kalona's Fall and can be read separately)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

victoria_anne

Title: Norse Mythology

Author: Neil Gaiman

Genre: Contemporary fiction / Myths and legends

Year published: 2017

Summary: From the dawn of the world to the twilight of the gods, this is a dazzling retelling of the great Norse myths from the award-winning, bestselling Neil Gaiman.

Why I would recommend it: This is seriously the only book on Norse mythology you will ever need. Neil Gaiman has retold the stories of the Norse Gods (including Thor, Odin, Loki, and Freya) in a fictional short story format, and for anyone who knows Neil Gaiman, you know they are written wonderfully and with a bit of humour thrown in. It even includes a glossary of names, places, and objects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vilja

Title:Celtic Myths and Legends

Author: Peter Berresford Ellis

Genre: Myths and Legends

Year published: 2002

Summary:

This is an enchantingly told collection of the stirring sagas of gods and goddesses, fabulous beasts, strange creatures, and such heroes as Cuchulain, Fingal, and King Arthur from the ancient Celtic world. Included are popular myths and legends from all six Celtic cultures of Western Europe—Irish, Scots, Manx, Welsh, Cornish, and Breton. Here for the modern reader are the rediscovered tales of cattle raids, tribal invasions, druids, duels, and doomed love that have been incorporated into, and sometimes distorted by, European mythology and even Christian figures.

Why I would recommend it:

I think for any Harry Potter fan mythodology is a central issue, since there are so many references to it in the books. This is a really great collection of stories and figures, and I find it very inspiring for fanfiction writing as well. Not to mention that it's fun to read :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nott theodore

Title: The Pendragon Cycle (a series of 5 books, in reading order: Taliesin, Merlin, Arthur, Pendragon, Grail)

Author: Stephen Lawhead

Genre: Myths and legends, Fantasy

Year published: 1987 (first book) to 1997

Summary: (of Taliesin, from amazon)

It was a time of legend, when the last shadows of the mighty Roman conqueror faded from the captured Isle of Britain. While across a vast sea, bloody war shattered a peace that had flourished for two thousand years in the doomed kingdom of Atlantis.

 

Taliesin is the remarkable adventure of Charis, the Atlantean princess who escaped the terrible devastation of her homeland, and of the fabled seer and druid prince Taliesin, singer at the dawn of the age. It is the story of an incomparable love that joined two worlds amid the fires of chaos, and spawned the miracles of Merlin...and Arthur the king.

Why you would recommend it: I love this series so much. It's a really interesting take on the Arthurian legends, mixing different elements in with magic and the legend of Atlantis. It's impossible not to fall in love with the characters and the writer's description and style are brilliant, as are his characterisations when we see the different narrators and protagonists of different books. This series really delves into the legends of Arthur and Merlin and Britain in this time period, and they're a fantastic read.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BellaLestrange87

Title: Station Eleven

Author: Emily St. John Mandel

Genre: literary fiction

Year published: 2014

Summary: One snow night Arthur Leander, a famous Hollywood actor, dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time - from Arthur's early days as a film star to twenty years in the future, when a theatre troupe known as the Travelling Symphony roam the wasteland of what remains - this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five people: Arthur, the man who tried to save him, Arthur's first wife, his oldest friend, and a young actress with the Travelling Symphony caught in the crosshairs of a dangerous self-proclaimed prophet. Sometimes terrifying, sometimes tender, Station Eleven tells a story about the relationships that sustain us, the ephemeral nature of fame, and the beauty of the world as we know it. (from back cover)

Why I would recommend it: This book is so good; the prose is amazing, the characterization is excellent, and the pace of the novel is just right. It explores topics like fame and humanity without seeming too heady or philosophical.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MuggleMaybe

Title: An Ember in the Ashes

Author: Sabaa Tahir

Genre: YA fantasy

Year published: 2015

Summary: from Amazon:

Laia is a slave. Elias is a soldier. Neither is free.

 

Under the Martial Empire, defiance is met with death. Those who do not vow their blood and bodies to the Emperor risk the execution of their loved ones and the destruction of all they hold dear.

 

It is in this brutal world, inspired by ancient Rome, that Laia lives with her grandparents and older brother. The family ekes out an existence in the Empire’s impoverished backstreets. They do not challenge the Empire. They’ve seen what happens to those who do.

 

But when Laia’s brother is arrested for treason, Laia is forced to make a decision. In exchange for help from rebels who promise to rescue her brother, she will risk her life to spy for them from within the Empire’s greatest military academy.

 

There, Laia meets Elias, the school’s finest soldier—and secretly, its most unwilling. Elias wants only to be free of the tyranny he’s being trained to enforce. He and Laia will soon realize that their destinies are intertwined—and that their choices will change the fate of the Empire itself.

 

Why I would recommend it: I feel silly for not having recommended this already, because it is one of the best books I've read in the past few years. YA fantasy is such a huge and popular genre these days, but honestly I feel like a lot of the stuff out there blurs together. Not this book! Sabaa Tahir has a distinct writing style that is beautiful but also down to earth. The main characters are both SO complex and interesting, and their relationship with each other is super complex, too. Also, this is one of the most unique fantasy worlds I've encountered. It draws from middle eastern lore, which is a lovely breath of fresh air. The second book in the series, A Torch Against the Night, is also good. There are two more books planned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sihaya

Title: The Return of the Elderlings Series (comprising of 5 series: The Farseer Trilogy, Liveship Traders Trilogy, Tawny Man Trilogy, The Rain Wilds Chronicles, The Fitz and The Fool Trilogy) (ps this is the recommended reading order & order of publication, but I got told to swap liveship and tawny man and having done it I would also recommend that)

Author: Robin Hobb

Genre: Fantasy

Year published: The first book in 1995, the last book in 2017 (so it's the perfect time to read them now, they're all out!)

Summary: Just of the first trilogy to avoid spoilers: Fitz is the bastard son of a prince, and bastards can be very useful to the royal family - they're useful, important, and expendable. To make him useful to the family, Fitz is trained in the shadows to be an assassin - all the while navigating those who want him dead, his first love, friendships, magic, and a war.

Why I would recommend it: So, as anyone who follows me on twitter would know, I've been shouting the praises of these books from the rooftop to anyone who so much as looks at me sideways. Robin Hobb is an amazing worldbuilder - the books are a little hard to get into because she refuses to hand-hold the reader, you are plunged into as strange a world as the six year old boy the story begins with and it takes some time to get your bearings. But as the world slowly unfolds, it is truly delightful. The cultures of each of the lands are distinct and beautifully crafted. Almost all of the characters are people of colour, and you'll come across a few lgbt characters in the course of the books as well (I can't say too much here though, because spoilers).

Her true strength though, what will really draw you in, is her characters. The first trilogy, as well as the Tawny Man and Fitz & the Fool are all written in first person, from Fitz's point of view - and he is such a wonderfully complex character. He's so vividly created that by the time you're done, he will feel like an old friend. He's such a good person at heart, but you'll also spend a good deal of time yelling at him for being an oblivious fool. Stuff that is obvious to the reader completely slides him by, showing how his biases shape how he sees the world. All of the other characters are just as wonderful and dynamic, even if the story isn't told from their pov, and the relationships between Fitz and everyone else are as real and wonderfully dynamic as the characters. I've honestly never read characters who are all so vivid and believable and truly stay in your heart.

I cannot recommend these books enough - I only finished them a week ago and I'm still not sure I'll ever be able to read another book again, because nothing can ever top these.

Edited by LadyL8
Fixed text size to make it more readable

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

victoria_anne

Title: Eliza and Her Monsters

Author: Francesca Zappia

Genre: Young adult

Year published: 2017

Summary:

In the real world, Eliza Mirk is shy, weird, and friendless. Online, she’s LadyConstellation, the anonymous creator of the wildly popular webcomic Monstrous Sea. Eliza can’t imagine enjoying the real world as much as she loves the online one, and she has no desire to try.

 

Then Wallace Warland, Monstrous Sea’s biggest fanfiction writer, transfers to her school. Wallace thinks Eliza is just another fan, and as he draws her out of her shell, she begins to wonder if a life offline might be worthwhile.

 

But when Eliza’s secret is accidentally shared with the world, everything she’s built—her story, her relationship with Wallace, and even her sanity—begins to fall apart.

Why I would recommend it: Dear Lord this book is amazing. I couldn't put it down and finished it within two days. I found it wonderfully relatable. Obviously my work isn't as internationally renowned as Eliza's, but I understood the double life she leads, how different she can be on the internet, and how her parents just have no idea, and even when they do they don't understand. It's a fantastic read that I think everyone on this site will appreciate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

forever_dreaming
Title: The Woman Warrior: A Girlhood Among Ghosts 

Author: Maxine Hong Kingston 

Genre: Nonfiction/Memoir (I know this isn't necessarily a popular genre, but give it a try!) 

Year published: 1975

Summary: A Chinese American woman tells of the Chinese myths, family stories and events of her California childhood that have shaped her identity. It is a sensitive account of growing up female and Chinese-American in a California laundry.

Why I would recommend it: This book is so powerful. Being an Asian girl myself (Indian, not Chinese, but as I discovered through this book, there isn't really that great of a difference between the two cultures), this book left such a great impact on me. Even more than learning about the Chinese culture and what it means to be a Chinese girl and the burdens placed on you as a result, what I loved most was the emphasis on the power of words. This is a memoir of how the author found her voice in a society that demands that her voice be suppressed and quieted, and that in itself was inspiring. It made me treasure my words as my most powerful tool. Ahh. I really can't verbalize properly how much I loved this book! I had to read it for school, but I am definitely going to reread it--it's the sort of book that reading it over again and again will only lead me to discover more amazing subtleties and gain an even deeper appreciation of this amazing work. Read it, you won't regret it!! :D 
Edited by forever_dreaming
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aphoride

Title: Pale Fire
Author: Vladimir Nabokov
Genre: Literary fiction
Year published: 1962 (originally - it's been re-printed many times since then :P) 
Summary: The American poet John Shade is dead; murdered. His last poem, Pale Fire, is put into a book, together with a preface, a lengthy commentary and notes by Shade's editor, Charles Kinbote. Known on campus as the 'Great Beaver', Kinbote is haughty, inquisitive, intolerant, but is he also mad, bad - and even dangerous? As his wildly eccentric annotations slide into the personal and the fantastical, Kinbote reveals perhaps more than he should. Nabokov's darkly witty, richly inventive masterwork is a suspenseful whodunit, a story of one-upmanship and dubious penmanship, and a glorious literary conundrum. (From Waterstones bookshop :P) 
Why I would recommend it: It's a masterpiece. Honestly, it really is. The book is presented as the poem, with the preface, commentary, and notes. It goes into such beautiful depth of characterisation, and creates this beautifully rich country of Zembla and such a vivid recounting of the events which unfold there - which link up to the poem and the poem's author. The book hinges on this friendship and affection between the two main characters: John Shade and Charles Kinbote; how Kinbote recounts Zembla to Shade, and how Shade works, all the time, on the unseen, heralded poem, Pale Fire. There's nothing exceptionally stirring or captivating about a lot of the events in the book: it talks about daily life, explorations and tribulations of life, as much as it tells about more exotic and adventurous things, but there's something about it which draws you in and doesn't let you go. It's the kind of book which lingers and you can't explain why, it just does. At the end, you'll sit there and still have a thousand questions about what actually happened, what really went on, what was the point of it all - but you'll feel completely satisfied with it nonetheless. Truthfully, it's been a long time since I loved a book as much as I loved this one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

scooterbug8515

Title: Pendragon Series
Author: D J MacHale
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Year published: 2002
Summary: The series focuses on the chronicles of Bobby Pendragon, an American teenager who discovers that he must travel through time and space to prevent the destruction of the ten "territories": critical locations throughout the universe.   Each book deals with the battle over a particular territory, fought by Bobby's side against the forces of Saint Dane, a shapeshifting demon, who exploits a decisive turning point for the local people of each territory. At this turning point, Saint Dane steps in to guide the territory towards utter chaos, with Bobby and his allies attempting to stop his efforts.*
Why I would recommend it: This series is amazing, it has a bit of history and loads of fantasy, the characters are compelling and the story just pulls you right in.  When I picked up the first book I knew it had to be mine when the story starts out with the main characters, Bobby writing to his friend Mark.  He states how he's been in this huge fight and the world as he knows it is not what he thought it was having now traveled through space and time but that isn't important what is important is their schoolmate Cortney kissed him. That was what he had to tell his friend first, near death experiences could wait first Cortney kissed him.

 

*Summary is taken from Wikipedia

Edited by scooterbug8515

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Renacerá

Title: The Girl of Fire and Thorns

Author: Rae Carson

Genre: Young Adult Fiction

Year Published: 2011

Summary:

Quote

Once a century, one person is chosen for greatness.

Elisa is the chosen one. 

But she is also the younger of two princesses, the one who has never done anything remarkable. She can't see how she ever will. 

Now, on her sixteenth birthday, she has become the secret wife of a handsome and worldly king—a king whose country is in turmoil. A king who needs the chosen one, not a failure of a princess.

And he's not the only one who seeks her. Savage enemies seething with dark magic are hunting her. A daring, determined revolutionary thinks she could be his people's savior. And he looks at her in a way that no man has ever looked at her before. Soon it is not just her life, but her very heart that is at stake.

Elisa could be everything to those who need her most. If the prophecy is fulfilled. If she finds the power deep within herself. If she doesn’t die young.

Most of the chosen do.

Why I Would Recommend It:
love this series for so many reasons! This book is the first in a trilogy, and I cannot recommend it enough. Elisa is a badass woman of color who grows so much throughout the series. The cast of characters is fantastic and compelling. The plot of each book is thrilling and delves into political intrigue and how countries are held together even with young leaders. I love watching the characters grow and change and face obstacles and trauma and difficulty. These books are just delightful.

 

P.S. - If you do read them, shoot me a message afterward so that we can talk about them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

poppunkpadfoot

Title: Girl Mans Up

Author: M-E Girard

Genre: YA

Year published: 2016

Summary: All Pen wants is to be the kind of girl she’s always been. So why does everyone have a problem with it? They think the way she looks and acts means she’s trying to be a boy—that she should quit trying to be something she’s not. If she dresses like a girl, and does what her folks want, it will show respect. If she takes orders and does what her friend Colby wants, it will show her loyalty. But respect and loyalty, Pen discovers, are empty words. Old-world parents, disintegrating friendships, and strong feelings for other girls drive Pen to see the truth--that in order to be who she truly wants to be, she’ll have to man up.

Why I would recommend it: While I didn't think this book was completely flawless, I had a lot of fun reading it. It was really touching and had great characters (and some really frustrating ones too, but what would a story be with no conflict?). I found it to be honest and sincere, and didn't shy away from addressing tough situations and emotions. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

forever_dreaming

Title: Rebel of the Sands 

Author: Alwyn Hamilton 

Genre: YA Fantasy/Romance/Magical Realism 

Year published: 2016 

Summary:

Quote

She’s more gunpowder than girl—and the fate of the desert lies in her hands.

Mortals rule the desert nation of Miraji, but mystical beasts still roam the wild and barren wastes, and rumor has it that somewhere, djinni still practice their magic. But there's nothing mystical or magical about Dustwalk, the dead-end town that Amani can't wait to escape from. 

Destined to wind up "wed or dead," Amani’s counting on her sharpshooting skills to get her out of Dustwalk. When she meets Jin, a mysterious and devastatingly handsome foreigner, in a shooting contest, she figures he’s the perfect escape route. But in all her years spent dreaming of leaving home, she never imagined she'd gallop away on a mythical horse, fleeing the murderous Sultan's army, with a fugitive who's wanted for treason. And she'd never have predicted she'd fall in love with him... or that he'd help her unlock the powerful truth of who she really is.

Why I would recommend it: I read this book a little while ago so I don't quite remember all the plot points, but I remember distinctly that Amani left an impression on me as a strong, but fallible female heroine. YA books generally get one or the other, but the two in one character, so Amani is possibly one of the realest female heroines I've ever read. I also really loved the setting and fantastical world created—Alwyn Hamilton has a fantastic imagination! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

scooterbug8515

Title: Ready Player One

Author: Ernest Cline

Genre: Sci-fi/dystopian

Year Published: 2011

Summary: Welcome to the OASIS, a hyper-realistic, 3D, video game paradise. It's 2045, and pretty much everyone logs into the OASIS daily to escape their terrible lives, lives affected by overpopulation, unemployment, and energy shortages. Eighteen-year-old Wade Watts is one of these people, and he has a mission: to find an Easter egg hidden inside the OASIS by its wackadoodle creator, James Halliday.*

Why You're Recommending It: This book is AMAZING, if you are a sci-fi geek you will be sure to recognize something from the book.  If you remember or know anything of the 80's you will recognize a lot in the book.  The easter egg hunt set forth by James Halliday requires one to be familiar with the pop-culture of the 80's. You follow Wade in his hunt for the eggs, his fight for survival, as a corporation is after the eggs as well, to make a profit.  The corporation will stop at nothing, including murder. to get what they want.  The geekery, the 80's, and the action all combine for a really amazing and fun read! That I would recommend to any geek out there!  Also, a movie is soon to come out, and you know the books are 99% of the time better. So, you wanna read the book before seeing the movie!  Oh, and if this adds an incentive to the fact that the book is awesome, the audio version is narrated by Will Wheaton.  

 

*Summary borrowed from shmoop.com

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BellaLestrange87

Title: This Savage Song

Author: Victoria Schwab

Genre: YA

Year published: 2016

Summary: (from Goodreads) Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city—a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who’s just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives.

Why you're recommending it: I love the concept - of Verity, of monsters being spawned by acts of violence - and the book is so, so, so good. I couldn't put it down. I may or may not have been reading it in a lecture :ninja: Kate is feisty and arrogant, while August is a monster who feels most human after committing violence, and the two of them have excellent chemistry (without making this book a crappy romance :twothumbsup:). The sequel is going to be my post-exam reward to myself.  :shifty:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Veritaserum27
Quote

I couldn't find the thread for professional authors, so I'd like to post here. If someone has already posted the same topic, please move or lock this topic, staffers.

 

I might be late for reading Kazuo Ishiguro's books after he got a Novel-sho (Prize), I finished reading two of his works, 'Never Let Me Go' (M) and 'When We Were Orphans'(M). After reading them, I wondered if I should've read in English, but now I think  it was better that I read in Japanese. Their interpretation was beautifully done, I could enjoy his works very well. Very nostalgic, sad and full of friendship and affection. At the same time I felt for main characters, their feeling powerless against their fate and self-pity and effort to take what they were. 

 

Have you read his books before? What did you read? How did you feel after reading his works?

Edit by Staff:  Original post by StarFeather.  This post was moved from the Author Recommendations thread to here, because that thread is for fanfic only.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MuggleMaybe
Posted (edited)

Title: milk and honey

Author: Rupi Kaur

Genre: poetry

Year published: 2014

Summary (from Goodreads) milk and honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. It is about the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity. It is split into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose, deals with a different pain, heals a different heartache. milk and honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

Why I would recommend it: This recommendation arrives via one of my awesome students, who read this and became absolutely addicted to poetry, particularly in this style. Frankly, I can't think of any higher recommendation than that! I read this in the span of an hour or two, and it really struck a cord with me. In particular, I love the way Kaur addresses femininity. Plus, the poems are reasonably concrete and quite short, which helped me since I don't read a lot of poetry and am easily intimidated by it. 

Edited by MuggleMaybe
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kerney
Posted (edited)

Title: Please Don't Tell My Parents I'm a Super Villain

Author: Richard Roberts

Genre:  YA

Year published: 2014

Summary (from Goodreads) Penelope Akk wants to be a superhero. She's got superhero parents. She's got the ultimate mad science power, filling her life with crazy gadgets even she doesn't understand. She has two super powered best friends. In middle school, the line between good and evil looks clear.
In real life, nothing is that clear.

All it takes is one hero's sidekick picking a fight, and Penny and her friends are labeled supervillains. In the process, Penny learns a hard lesson about villainy: She's good at it.

Criminal masterminds, heroes in power armor, bottles of dragon blood, alien war drones, shape shifters and ghosts, no matter what the super powered world throws at her, Penny and her friends come out on top. They have to. If she can keep winning, maybe she can clear her name before her mom and dad find out.

Why I would recommend it:  Premise alone and execution. The world building and the characters and a lot of fun attention to detail, for example, middle school supervillians miss without supertransport....take the subway.

Oh, and the sequels.

Edited by Kerney

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

VaguelyCreativeName

Title:  A Little Life
Author: Hanya Yanagihara
Genre: Literary Fiction/LGBTQ+/I would also argue for bildungsroman, but I'm bad at defining genres
Year Published: 2015
Summary: When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they're broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity. 

Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he’ll not only be unable to overcome—but that will define his life forever.  (Taken from goodreads)

Why would I recommend it: This is my go-to recommendation for anyone, really, although you should be aware that it is - though of course there are happy moments, times when everything seems brilliant -  fundamentally a sad story. I have seldom cried this much over a novel. Yanagihara tells a gripping tale, beautifully written, and her rich, intriguing characters make it difficult to ever put the book down, though of course the character that really captures you is Jude, who - I wish I could phrase it better, more originally, but no - is a troubled sould, deeply tortured by his early childhood experiences, and not only tethers his friends to him, but also the reader. Seriously, I couldn't stop thinking abouth this book and its character(s), and even now, more than two years after I first read it, there are still times when I have to pause what I'm doing because I've just remembered something, which I guess, is why I'm writing this recommendation. I wish I was a more talented reviewer because I just don't feel I'm doing this book justice. Honestly, it was hands down one of the best books I've ever read; heart-breaking, harrowing, at times horrifying, and so, so fantastic. Like, this book is pretty much the love of my life.

Also, this book deals with a lot of important issues (such as race, sexuality, disability, and mental illness), but it never feels over-bearing, or too much, or like it's trying to educate you. However, since not everybody is comfortable reading about these sort of things, be aware that the novel touches upon depression, self-harm (at times quite graphic descriptions), suicide/suicidal thoughts, rape, and child abuse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BellaLestrange87

Title: If We Were Villains

Author: M.L. Rio

Genre: literary/upmarket/mystery

Year Published: 2017

Summary: Enter the players. There were seven of us then, seven bright young things with wide precious futures ahead of us. Until that year, we saw no further than the books in front of our faces.

On the day Oliver Marks is released from jail, the man who put him there is waiting at the door. Detective Colborne wants to know the truth, and after ten years, Oliver is finally ready to tell it.

Ten years ago: Oliver is one of seven young Shakespearean actors at Dellecher Classical Conservatory, a place of keen ambition and fierce competition. In this secluded world of firelight and leather-bound books, Oliver and his friends play the same roles onstage and off: hero, villain, tyrant, temptress, ingénue, extra. But in their fourth and final year, the balance of power begins to shift, good-natured rivalries turn ugly, and on opening night real violence invades the students’ world of make believe. In the morning, the fourth-years find themselves facing their very own tragedy, and their greatest acting challenge yet: convincing the police, each other, and themselves that they are innocent.

Part coming-of-age story, part confession, If We Were Villains explores the magical and dangerous boundary between art and life. In this tale of loyalty and betrayal, madness and ecstasy, the players must choose what roles to play before the curtain falls.
(from Goodreads)

Why I would recommend it: This book is SO. GOOD. The pacing is perfect, the characterizations are perfect (the characters seem to occupy a cliched role but are revealed to be so much more than that), the portrayal of the plays is excellent. After The Incident, the depiction of how the characters slowly unravel is amazing. I found it very addicting and had a hard time putting it down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

starbuck
Posted (edited)

Title: Red Rising Saga (Red Rising, Golden Son, Morning Star, Iron Gold + two upcoming books but the first three are pretty standalone, Iron Gold happens 10 years after Morning Star ends)

Author: Pierce Brown

Genre: Science Fiction (YA kind of, but my brother read it and loved it and he's in his mid 30s so.)

Year published: 2014

Summary: i'll copy&paste from goodreads because idk how to write a proper summary :P

Quote

Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations.

Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children.

But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity already reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet. Darrow—and Reds like him—are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class.

Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Institute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste, where the next generation of humanity's overlords struggle for power. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society's ruling class. There, he will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies... even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.

Why I would recommend it: because when i started reading this i COULDN'T STOP. and this is a GRRM-would-approve-book. there are no black&white characters, nobody is perfect and everyone has flaws, the good guys can be bad and vice versa. it's exciting and binge-read-inducing. you'll get annoyed by the hero and his actions but then you'll love him all over again. which is pretty much the same for 90% of the characters in these books :P

Edited by starbuck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×